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Sun-Herald

Backbeat

Author: By RochelleTubb
Date: 13/07/1996
Words: 1742
          Publication: Sun Herald
Section: Tempo
Page: 16
Speed kings

If you want to "hang five" but don't like the water, then check out the latest malibu skateboard: it's long, fast and a little dangerous

THE malibu board has experienced several revivals since it was first introduced into Australian waters in 1956, but its latest reincarnation will offer a new dimension to longboard riding.

Northern beaches business partners Rory Gorman, 36, and John Gill, 28, have decided to take malibus out

of the surf and - after a little bit of redesigning and a set of wheels - put them on the streets.

Gorman and Gill have been making and testing malibu skateboards for the past six months and have come up with a 1.36m beast made from special timber, which can reach speeds of up to 65kph.

They claim that the grunge generation has stolen the skateboarding image from surfers and now they want to steal it back.

"Skateboards have always been associated with surfers; we've been riding them since we were kids," Gill says.

On winter weekends

when the surf isn't pumping, the guys take their

malibus up to a secret location to do some speed runs and hang five.

"The difference between riding a short skateboard and the malibu board is like the difference between surfing on a longboard and surfing on a shortboard," Gill says.

"Longboarding is very classic and smooth and that's why we've designed these boards because they follow the same principles.

"You can walk-the-board and hang five and even hang 10 on these long boards. Manoeuvring is very different than that of a shortboard. It's more like snowboarding on wheels."

Gorman and Gill saw the concept for the malibu skateboards on a

television program that showed that these longboards were all the rage among surfers on the west coast of the United States.

They adapted the concept to their own designs and spend four to five hours making every board by hand. They cost around $180.

"We build these boards so you can keep them for the rest of your life," Gorman says.

"A lot of people just want them to look at and hang on their wall. Some of the older guys are a little daunted by the prospect of actually riding them."

"A lot of people just want them to look at and hang on their wall. Some of the older guys are a little daunted by the prospect of actually riding them."

That these "older guys" are daunted by land malibus is quite ironic: one of the best aspects of these larger, more stable, skateboards is that they don't get the death wobbles at high speeds.

But, like riding anything, there's always the possibility of having a stack.

"I fell off yesterday when I was doing some big carves," Gorman says. "I hit a stone and tumbled down the road. But I wasn't seriously injured. "And it's all part of the thrill."

Rochelle Tubb

the hiplist

IN THE SHADES

One of Australia's grooviest labels, Johnny Dexter, has just put out a great pair of black, wraparound sunglasses, valued at $29.95, and Backbeat is giving away 80 pairs. The cool sunnies complement Johnny Dexter's new faux-70s collection of

body-hugging,

rib-ticklin' knitwear, suits and swinging shift dresses. Johnny Dexter's spring/summer collection is in-store throughout July and August. For your chance to win a pair, phone 0055 65594 before midnight on Wednesday.

BATTLE OF THE BANDS

University and TAFE campuses across Australia are bracing themselves for the 1996 NAD campus band competition, which is expected to attract more than 1,000 entries. Last year's winner, Jebediah, a heavy pop band from Perth, is now making it on the national band scene, thanks to the exposure and support it got after winning last year's competition. If your band has what it takes, you could end up with $5,000 worth of NAD hi-fi equipment, a national campus tour, recording contract and national exposure on music channels. NSW heats run up until August. For more information talk to your Students' Association or check out the NAD net site at http://www.nad.com.au

CELLULOID SEX

If the steamy sex scenes in the latest movie releases get a little too much, we've got the perfect solution. In a bid to promote safer sex, Ansell has put together a pack of goodies including two admit-one passes for any movie at Village Cinemas or Drive Ins, Greater Union and BC&C theatres, and a selection of packaged Ansell Condoms and Personal Lubricant, all of which is valued at about $30. For your chance to win one of 10 "Great Condom Moments on Stage and Screen" packs, call 0055 65595 before midnight on Wednesday.

CELLULOID SEX

If the steamy sex scenes in the latest movie releases get a little too much, we've got the perfect solution. In a bid to promote safer sex, Ansell has put together a pack of goodies including two admit-one passes for any movie at Village Cinemas or Drive Ins, Greater Union and BC&C theatres, and a selection of packaged Ansell Condoms and Personal Lubricant, all of which is valued at about $30. For your chance to win one of 10 "Great Condom Moments on Stage and Screen" packs, call 0055 65595 before midnight on Wednesday.

LUCK OF THE IRISH

To celebrate the arrival of Irish band The Corrs, Backbeat is giving away a double pass to their concert at the Enmore Theatre on July 17 and 10 copies of their new album Forgiven Not Forgotten. The Corrs, made up of Jim, Andrea, Caroline and Sharon Corr, is a traditional Irish pop/rock band that blends acoustic instruments and Celtic sounds with modern instruments. Runaway was the first single released from the album. For your chance to win, phone 0055 65592 before midnight tonight. For all 0055 numbers, Legion Telecall premium rate maximum call cost is 50c. A higher rate applies for mobile and public phones. TC95/5342.

BarFly

WHEN a UK fan letter arrived at Neighbours headquarters last year for Emma Harrison, she was a little surprised: her character, Joanna, (Annaliese's sister) had yet to appear on-air overseas. The letter, says Emma, was a good indication that even after 10 years the Brits are still batty about our Ramsey Street stars.

"It was really weird," she says. "I have no idea how they knew I was even in the series. One of their Australian friends must have rung them up and told them. I thought, I haven't even received any fan letters from Australians yet."

"It was really weird," she says. "I have no idea how they knew I was even in the series. One of their Australian friends must have rung them up and told them. I thought, I haven't even received any fan letters from Australians yet."

Now living in Melbourne, Emma tries to get up to Sydney to see friends and have a night out whenever she can. One of her favourite hangouts is the trendy Bayswater Brasserie, a popular restaurant with a bar out the back, in Kings Cross.

"This is one of my favourite places to eat because the food is light and the bar is great for a pre-dinner drink."

Sipping on a vodka, lime and soda, Emma says Sydney is her favourite city.

"I lived here for two years before I moved to Melbourne," she says. "I really love it here. There's so much life and atmosphere. It's got great restaurants and a really good vibe."

Emma, who's been on Neighbours for nearly a year, decided to pursue a career as an actress at the age of 15. Prior to landing a role on Neighbours, she featured in an Australian series of Mission: Impossible and starred in a number of commercials and music clips. Emma also played Jean Claude Van Damme's girlfriend in the movie Street Fighter, which featured former Neighbours star Kylie Minogue.

"When I started with Neighbours I came in as the little confused sister of Annaliese (Kimberley Davies) but now Joanna Hartman (her character) is developing as a solid confident character," she says. "I love acting five days a week and I feel like this job can take me a long way in the acting world."

Rochelle Tubb

cd romp

MINT CAR

The Cure (Fiction/Warner)

"The sun is up," sings Robert Smith, "I'm so happy I could scream." After Friday I'm In Love you'd think the short, pasty one with the black lipstick would have had quite enough of being jaunty and joyous, and head back to the creepy, uneasy songs of despair he has been lionised for. Mint Car - saved only by Smith's distinct whine - smacks of a band fast running out of ideas. The Cure on auto-pilot is no fun at all.

"The sun is up," sings Robert Smith, "I'm so happy I could scream." After Friday I'm In Love you'd think the short, pasty one with the black lipstick would have had quite enough of being jaunty and joyous, and head back to the creepy, uneasy songs of despair he has been lionised for. Mint Car - saved only by Smith's distinct whine - smacks of a band fast running out of ideas. The Cure on auto-pilot is no fun at all.

**

I LIKE THE WAY

Deni Hines (Mushroom)

Another day, another photo of Deni Hines naked with only her hands to hide her modesty. What gives? Hines has a beautiful voice that occasionally offers a tantalising world-weariness, yet she is guilty of chasing the wrong material. This powder puff, soft-dance stuff about rubbing her man down and bonking all night is banal, and does little other than slot her in neatly alongside a million faceless female American divas who can hold a note and not much else.

*

ENZSO

Enzso (Sony)

As the keyboardist with Split Enz, Eddie Rayner was rarely one to understate things. His kaleidescopic musical mind was inextricably linked with the majestic sweep and oddity of the Enz. Twelve years after its last studio LP, Rayner chose a handful of his favourite Split Enz songs and wrote parts for a 70-piece orchestra and 30-piece choir. There are nice touches, such as

Rayner exposing the melodic lineage between Split Enz's Straight Old Line and Crowded House's In The Lowlands, the reworking of Tim Finn's obscure masterpiece Stuff And Nonsense and an elegant arrangement of 1984's Voices. Gregarious Kiwi poet Sam Hunt's reading of Under The Wheel is suitably sad, eerie and oppressive, while I See Red probably wasn't

in need of rearranging.

***

 
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