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Sun-Herald

Coffee on the quiet

Author: By RACHEL BROWNE
Date: 29/07/1995
Words: 490
          Publication: Sun Herald
Section: NEWS
Page: 120
TEMPANY Deckert has fallen pregnant from a one night stand, miscarried the baby in a corridor at school, helped her best friend battle anorexia and faced the amorous advances of an older man.

It's all in a day's work on planet Home And Away where she landed last year to play the long-suffering Selina Cook.

Deckert laughed at the troubles she and her character have had to endure, saying it's all grist for the Summer Bay mill.

"What can you say? I have done some of the weirdest things I would never have thought I'd have to do in my acting career thanks to Selina," she said, sipping on a flat white at Cremorne's funky Metropolis Cafe.

"Selina has a bizarre life. When she got pregnant that was hard, really, really shocking because I had no idea that was going to happen to her.

"Then the producers told me she was going to miscarry and I thought, fine, at least I don't have to give birth.

"Then they told me she was going to have the miscarriage in the school corridor. I said, 'You're kidding. No way. Are you telling me I'm going to miscarry in front of 20 extras?'."

Playing the tough and tarty but trauma-torn Selina has made Deckert popular with the fans of Channel 7's top-rating seaside soap, most of whom sympathise with her.

"No one's ever been rude to me about the character or the show. I think it's because everyone feels sorry for Selina so they're really nice to me," she said.

"The backhanded compliments are the funniest. So many people say to me, 'Gee, you look like such a dog on the show, you look so different in person'."

Privacy is one reason why Deckert has become a devotee of Metropolis Cafe, which has a quiet back room where she can wind down with her friends.

"This place is really relaxing. At a lot of cafes the staff have this real attitude: we're cool and hip and we don't have to try," she said.

"This is really nice because it attracts a mixed bunch of people and I can go out to the back room and play backgammon or just sit and read and no one ever bothers me.

"My friends and I often come here after going to the movies or after a night in the city."

Metropolis Cafe has the unpretentious appeal of an old-fashioned milk bar. The furniture is pure kitch with old laminated tables and original kitchenware which dates from the 50s and 60s.

Black and white photographs featuring scenes from old films or art deco buildings hang on the walls adding to the nostalgic feel.

The food, however, is modern Australian with the menu offering a small but well-chosen selection of pasta, nachos, pies, soups and salads and a chalk board with daily specials.

Deckert, who grew up on a farm in rural Victoria surrounded by her parents vast collection of antique furniture, loves the traditional atmosphere of the cafe.

As far as the future goes, Deckert, who now lives with relatives on Sydney's upper north shore, would like to continue acting while the jobs are there.

"It looks like the Australian film industry will take off over the next five years or so, so hopefully there will be some opportunities there," she said.

CHALKBOARD

Metropolis Cafe,

108 Glover St, Cremorne, Ph 953 9153

Open: Sun-Thurs 8.30am-midnight:

Fri-Sat 8.30am-1.30am

CUISINE: Traditional cafe favourites served in a fresh, imaginative way.

DRINKS: BYO

PRICES: Nachos $8-11, vegetarian/

meat lasagna $9, pasta $7.50, tuna and

fetta pie $7, focaccia $5-$8.50, soup

$5.50, coffee $2.20.

ATMOSPHERE: Like an old-fashioned

milk bar.

CREDIT CARDS: Yes.

 
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